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Mwf, 12: 00-12: 50 190 Hope Street, Rm. 206

Spring 2012 Kevin D. Goldberg

MWF, 12:00-12:50 190 Hope Street, Rm. 206

190 Hope Street, Rm. 102 Office Hours:

kevin_goldberg@brown.edu

401.863.2168

GRMN 1661E: Germany, Alcohol, and the Global Nineteenth Century



This course examines the German 19th century by exploring the production, sale, and consumption of alcohol. The ubiquity and cultural resonance of such an important social commodity allows us to better position Germany in an increasingly global context. Whether brewing beer in Chinese Tsingtao, harvesting grapes in California’s Napa Valley, or celebrating Purim with wine in Palestine, Germans experienced the global 19th century mediated by their own traditions, travels, and trades. Our methodology will cross disciplinary boundaries as we approach our subject from an anthropological, cultural studies, economic, and historical perspective. Our endeavors will be aided by the remarkable “Alcohol and Addiction Studies” special collections at the John Hay Library. Instruction and required readings in English. Optional readings and archival material available in other languages.

Grading



In-Class Contribution 30%

Book Review (2-3 pages) 20%

Object Analysis (2-3 pages) 20%

(Culinary Arts Museum, Providence)

Final Paper (10-12 pages) 30%

Requirements



Book Review: Each student will write a 2-3 page book review analyzing a reading from the syllabus or a reading chosen in consultation with the professor. The review will not only summarize your opinion of the book, but should also draw material and ideas from lectures, other readings, and professional reviews of the book.

Object Analysis: Each student will visit the Culinary Arts Museum at Johnson & Wales University. The museum houses an international collection of food and drink items (menus, art, cookbooks, kitchen equipment, etc.). Your 2-3 page paper should offer a summary of a particular area of the collection while including an analysis of an item’s symbolic significance and importance in its time and place.

Final Paper: The Brown University community is fortunate to have an excellent array of special collections available for use, including the unique and fascinating “Alcohol and Addiction Studies” collections. Combining ample material in multiple languages (some of which has still not been read and catalogued), the collections offer students the opportunity to engage primary source material on a first-hand basis. Each student will work with the professor and the research librarians in designing and researching a topic related to alcohol in Europe or the United States. Your paper will demonstrate your commitment to the research topic as well as your ability to critically engage and synthesize primary source material with secondary source readings. The paper will be due during finals week.

Books for Purchase (also on reserve at the Rockefeller Library)



-Sebastian Conrad, Globalization and the Nation in Imperial Germany (Cambridge University Press, 2010).

-B. Ann Tlusty, Bacchus and Civic Order: The Culture of Drink in Early Modern Germany (University of Virginia Press, 2001).

-Hans Fallada, The Drinker (Melville House, 2009).

Learning Objectives



Students will acquire an understanding of how a seemingly mundane commodity helps connect the world. Production techniques, sales strategies, and the rituals of alcohol consumption all proved to be highly translatable across national boundaries, leaving a clear example today of the inter-connectedness of the 19th century. In addition, we will see how alcoholism, treated as a disease today, was once considered a moral or ethical problem endemic to certain classes and races. Built into the course is a series of general lectures on the history of Germany and Europe in the nineteenth century. Use of the Alcohol and Addiction Studies collection in the John Hay Library will help all students improve their research and analytical skills.

Course Outline



N.B.: Unless otherwise indicated, Mondays are reserved for in-class lectures.

Early Modern Production and Consumption



Week 1: Introduction, Jan. 25-27

Week 2: Approaching Alcohol Studies, Jan. 30-Feb. 3

Wednesday: Introduction from Susanna Barrows and Robin Room, Drinking: Behavior and Belief in Modern History (University of California Press, 1991), 1-25.

Friday: Marianna Adler, “From Symbolic Exchange to Commodity Consumption: Anthropological Notes on Drinking as a Symbolic Practice,” in Barrows and Room, eds., Drinking: Behavior and Belief in Modern History, 376-398.

Week 3: Alcohol and Identity in the Atlantic World, Feb. 6-Feb. 10

Wednesday: David Hancock, “Commerce and Conversation in the Eighteenth Century Atlantic: The Invention of Madeira Wine,” Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 29, Nr 2. (Autumn, 1998): 197-219.

JSTOR



Friday: Chad Ludington, “Claret is the Liquor for Boys, Port for Men: How Port became the Englishman’s Wine, 1750-1800,” Journal of British Studies 48/2 (April, 2009): 364-390.

JSTOR



E.T.A. Hoffmann, The Golden Pot: A Modern Fairy Tale, 1-79.

Week 4: Taverns and Tussles, Feb. 13-Feb. 17

Wednesday and Friday: B. Ann Tlusty, Bacchus and Civic Order: The Culture of Drink in Early Modern Germany (University of Virginia Press, 2001).

Alcohol in the

Vormärz

and the 1848 Revolutions



Week 5: The Peasant and the Middle Class, Feb. 20-Feb. 24

Monday: University Closed.

Wednesday: Karl Marx, “Justification of the Correspondent from the Mosel,” selections from 1843, Rheinische Zeitung.

Friday: Wilhelm Heinrich Riehl, “Rheingau Vintners,” excerpt from Civil Society.

Sebastian Conrad, Globalisation and The Nation in Imperial Germany (Cambridge University Press, 2010), Introduction, 1-26; Chapter 1, 27-76

Colonial Empires, Immigration, and the Circulation of Goods



Week 6: Fermenting Trouble Abroad: Africa, Feb. 27-Mar. 2

Wednesday: Charles van Onselen, “Randlords and Rotgut 1886-1903: An Essay on the Role of Alcohol in the Development of European Imperialism and Southern African Capitalism, with Special Reference to Black Mineworkers in the Transvaal Republic,” History Workshop, Nr. 2 (Autumn, 1976): 33-89.

JSTOR



Friday: Conrad, Globalisation, Chapter 2, 77-143

Week 7: Fermenting Trouble Abroad: East Asia, Mar.5-Mar.9

Wednesday: Michael R. Godley, “Bacchus in the East: The Chinese Grape Wine Industry, 1892-1938,” Business History Review, Vol. 60 (Autumn 1986): 383-409.

JSTOR



Friday: Conrad, Globalisation, Chapter 4, 203-274

Week 8: Fermenting Trouble Abroad: The Americas, March 12-March 16

Wednesday: Melzer Flagg, “Remarks on the Culture of the Grape, and the Manufacture of Wine, in the Western States,” Cincinnati Horticultural Society (1846), 1-18.

Friday: Kevin Goldberg, “Biography of Jacob Beringer.” Immigrant Entrepreneurship, German Historical Institute.

Conrad, Globalisation, Chapter 5, 275-333

Jewish Questions



Week 9: The Shtetl and the Polish East, March 19-March 23

Monday: Glenn Dynner, “Legal Fictions: The Survival of Rural Jewish Tavernkeeping in the Kingdom of Poland,” Jewish Social Studies, Vol. 16, Nr. 2 (Winter, 2010): 28-66.

Project MUSE



Wednesday: Conrad, Globalisation, Chapter 3, 144-202

Friday: No Class

Week 10: No Class

Week 11: Jewish Ideas about Alcohol, April 2-April 6

Wednesday: Sander Gilman, “The Problem with Purim: Jews and Alcohol in the Modern Period,” Leo Baeck Yearbook (2005).

Friday: Marni Davis, “No Whiskey Amazons in the Tents of Israel: American Jews and the Gilded Age Temperance Movement,” American Jewish History, Vol. 94, Nr. 3 (September 2008): 143-173.

Project MUSE



Week 12: Alcoholic Antisemitism in Germany and Austria, April 9-April 13

Wednesday: Kevin Goldberg, “Reaping the Judenfrage: Jewish Wine Merchants in Central Europe before WWI.” Forthcoming in Agricultural History.

Friday: Ran Aaronsohn, “The Beginnings of Modern Jewish Agriculture in Palestine: ‘Indigenous’ versus ‘Imported,’ Agricultural History, Vol. 69, Nr. 3 (Summer, 1995): 438-453.

JSTOR



Science, Consumer Culture, and Luxury Capitalism



Week 13: The Science of Enology, April 16-April 20

Wednesday: Alessandro Stanziani, “Information, Quality and Legal Rules: Wine Adulteration in Nineteenth Century France,” Business History, Vol. 51, Nr. 2 (March 2009): 268-291.

Taylor & Francis Online



Friday: Sarah Jansen, “An American Insect in Imperial Germany: Visibility and Control in Making the Phylloxera in Germany, 1870-1914,” Science in Context, Vol. 13, Nr. 1 (2000): 31-70.

Militarism, Social Reform, and the Working Class



Week 14: The German Worker and His Drink, April 23-27

Wednesday: James S. Roberts, “Drink and Industrial Work Discipline in Nineteenth Century Germany,” Journal of Social History, 15 (1981): 25-38.

JSTOR



Friday: Eleanor L. Turk, “The Great Berlin Beer Boycott of 1894,” Central European History, Vol. 15, Nr. 4 (Dec., 1982): 377-397.

JSTOR



Friday: Robert Goodrich, “Confessional Drinking: Catholic Workingmen’s Clubs and Alcohol Consumption in Wilhelmine Germany,” in Histories of Leisure, ed. Rudy Koshar (2002).

Conrad, Globalisation, Chapter 6, 334-379

Week 15: Temperance Movements and German Militarism, May 7-May 11

Hay Library: Work Accidents in Völklingen

Hay Library: Assaults in Heidelberg

Hay Library: Competitive Walking in Kiel

Hay Library: Rabbi Wise of New York, “Prohibition Concerns the Jews.”

Hay Library: George Sylvester Viereck, “Why German-Americans Oppose Prohibition.”

Hay Library: What’ Germany’s Emperor thinks about Alcohol

Hay Library: US Congress: “Brewing and Liquor Interests and German Propaganda.”

Hay Library: Randolph Wellford Smith, The Sober World

Conrad, Globalisation, Chapter 7, 380-402Дадаць дакумент у свой блог ці на сайт 2010-07-19 18:44 Читать похожую статью
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